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Archive for the 'Twitter Lessons' Category

Twitter Mini-Lesson Series- Shopping

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your shopping vocabulary to become a master in bargaining in French. Here is the recap of last week’s phrases for your reference:

Flea market browsing and antique hunting, shopping…Now is time to “marchander”, “to bargain”!

To find antiques, go to “le marché aux puces”, the flea market. “Le marché aux puces est le samedi.”, “The flea market is on Saturdays.”

Now that merchant’s old bicycle is overpriced. Just tell him “C’est trop cher”, “It’s too expensive.”

You want to lower the price of this antique phone (after all, it doesn’t work!), “Vous pouvez baisser?”, “Can you lower the price?”

A tip to find cheap antiques, look for a “brocante” sign in villages. “Une brocante” is an rustic antique store, generally cheaper.

You only want to spend 5 euros on that cute silver spoon? “Je n’ai que 5 euros”, “I only have 5 euros.”

Twitter Mini-Lesson Series - At Home

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your house-related vocabulary to become a master in knowing French homes. Here is the recap of this week’s phrases for your reference:

Have you ever had a neighbor who kept complaining about “le bruit”, “the noise”? Or maybe you are the one who complains…

Your female neighbor is “la voisine”, and your male neighbor is “le voisin”.

Neighbors in their whole have a name in French, “le voisinage”.

A lot of “repas de quartier”, “block parties” are organized throughout French cities.

And if you live in the French country, you can go to the annual “fête du village” (fem.), like a block party, only for a whole village.

Now, if you live the French country, and have no neighbors, then you probably live by “un champ de blé”, “a wheat field”!

Enjoy!

Twitter Mini-Lessons - At Home II

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your house-related vocabulary to become a master in knowing French homes. Here is the recap of this week’s phrases for your reference:

If you are lucky and have a backyard, “un jardin”, you can sunbathe in the summer.

And if you don’t have a backyard, you can still open “la fenêtre”, “the window”, for some fresh air.

Take a look at your neighbor’s life by getting up “le toit”, ‘the roof”.

What do you do with your “garage”, “garage”? Park your car? Store your things?

You are “casanier” (male) or “casanière” (female) if you are a homebody “Je suis casanière en hiver.” In the winter I am being a homebody.

Enjoy!

Twitter Mini-Lessons - At Home I

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your house-related vocabulary to become a master in knowing French homes. Here is the recap of this week’s phrases for your reference:

Where you hang out with family and friends : “le salon”, “the living-room”.

Where the magic happens (or not) : “la cuisine”, “the kitchen”.

Where the magic also happens (or not) : “la chambre”, “the bedroom”.

Have you ever waited for someone to get out of the bahtroom, “la salle de bain”?

Usually in France the bathroom is separated from “les toilettes”, “the restrooms”.

It’s always nicer to work from home, in your  “bureau”, “office”.

Hope you enjoyed!

 

Twitter Mini-Lessons - Public Transportation

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your public transportation vocabulary to become a subway master in France. Here is the recap of this week’s phrases for your reference:

When users are mad at strikers from the Paris subway they say “RATP: Rentre Avec Tes Pieds”, “RATP: Go home by foot”.

Need you daily dose of caffeine while riding the train? Ask “Où est le wagon-restaurant?”, Where is the restaurant car?

When you missed your train and try to negotiate with an agent, start with “J’ai raté mon train”, I missed my train”.

Tired of public transportation? Get in a cab! Tell the driver where you go with “Je vais à …”, I am going to…

Using public transportation allows us to avoid “les embouteillages”, traffic jam.

Have you heard of “le vélib”? It’s a public bicycle rental program in Paris.

Bicycles in Paris have to ride on the bus lane, “le couloir de bus”. Dangerous!

Twitter Mini-Lessons - Public Transportation

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your public transportation vocabulary to become a subway master in France. Here is the recap of this week’s phrases for your reference:

Don’t wait for ever at that bus stop on a Sunday, and ask “Ce bus fonctionne le dimanche?”, Does this bus work on Sundays?

Are you given the look by someone you just bumped into? The basics: “Excusez-moi”, Sorry.

You’d better validate your ticket before you get on the train, “Où est-ce que je composte mon billet?”, Where do I validate my ticket?

Going to the Riviera and nver coming back? Ask for “un aller simple”, a one-way ticket, at the ticket booth.
Taking a day trip outside Paris and need a round trip ticket? Ask for “un aller-retour”, a round trip ticket.

Some country train station don’t have English signs. Look for a “guichet” sign to find the ticket booth.

Why is the train station empty? Why is the subway not working? There might be “une grève”, a strike.

When you ride Paris subway, you ride with la “Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens”, “Autonomous Management of Parisian Transportation”.

Twitter Mini-Lesson Recap

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your public transportation vocabulary to become a subway master in France.  Here is the recap of last week’s phrases for your reference:

When the bus map doesn’t make any sense to you, “Quel est le prochain arrêt?”, What is the next stop?

 

Don’t take the wrong bus, “Vous vous arrêtez à …(name of the stop)?”, Do you stop at (name of the stop)?

 

You need to find the right platform, “Où est le train pour (name of the city)?”, Where is the train for Bordeaux?

 

To be able to sit on the subway train, ride during “l’heure creuse”, off hours.

Vous descendez ici?

 

Someone stubbornly standing in the way of the bus door? Say “Excusez-moi, je descends ici”, Excuse me, I get off here.

 

Pregnant at rush hour? Say “Je voudrais m’asseoir s’il vous plaît.”, I would like to sit please.

 

Stay tuned daily for our tweets, and for those of you who haven’t started following us on Twitter, head there now and sign up!

Twitter Mini-Lesson Recap - Public Transportation

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your public transportation vocabulary to become a subway master in France.  Here is the recap of last week’s phrases for your reference:

 

Because you don’t want to ride the subway without a ticket, “Un ticket, s’il vous plait”, “One ticket please”.

 

When you stopped paying attention: “Quel est cet arret?”, “What is this station?”

 

One thing you want to avoid in the subway is “l’heure de pointe”, rush hour.

If someone tells you “Prenez le 58″ when you’re asking your way, understand “Take the 58 bus”.

 

If you couldn’t avoid rush hour, stepped on someone’s foot and want to stay out of trouble: “Excusez-moi”, “I am sorry.”

 

Stay tuned daily for our tweets, and for those of you who haven’t started following us on Twitter, head there now and sign up!

Twitter Mini-Lesson Recap!

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your media-related vocabulary in order to beat French people at conversing about the news.  Here is the recap of this week’s phrases for your reference:

When you don’t want to stain your fingers with newspaper’s ink: “Je lis l’actualité en ligne.”, “I read the news online.”

An easy one: “un magazine” is “a magazine”…but it’s always good to know.
You probably know that French people hate to find a typo, “une coquille”, in their newspaper.

To talk about all newspapers in general: “la presse écrite”. “La presse écrite attire moins de lecteurs.” “Newspapers are attracting less readers.”

Do you follow the news, “l’actualité”? “L’actualité de la semaine est inquiétante.”, “This week’s news are worrying.”
When you want to share the news with your French friends: “J’ai lu cet article aujourd’hui…”, “I read that article today…”
Not a weekly, not a monthly, but…a daily! “Un quotidien”, “Le New York Times” est un quotidien.”

Any questions? Feel free to ask in the comment section!

Stay tuned daily for our tweets, and for those of you who haven’t started following us on Twitter, head there now and sign up!

Twitter Mini-Lesson Recap!

In this series of mini-lesson tweets on Twitter, we help you perfect your media-related vocabulary in order to beat French people at conversing about the news.  Here is the recap of this week’s phrases for your reference:

“Un éditorial” gives you the paper’s opinion.”L’éditorial est sévère avec le président.”, “The editorial is tough on the president.”

Just so you know, the French for “buzz” is also “un buzz”. “Le discours de Barack Obama a fait un buzz en France.”

Subscribe to “un hebdomadaire” to get news every week. “Time” est un hebdomadaire”, “Time” is a weekly.”

Today’s word “un rédacteur en chef”, “an editor-in-chief”. “Le rédacteur en chef a le dernier mot sur le contenu.”, “The editor-in-chief” has the last word on the content.”

Another word stolen from English: “un blog”. “J’ai un blog sur le fromage”, “I have a blog about cheese.”

Do you watch “la série” “Lost”? Les français adorent la série “Lost”, French people love the show “Lost”.

When you want to watch a different program than what your girlfriend’s watching, you change “la chaîne”, “the channel”.

“Un pigiste” is a freelance writer, often a journalist. “Je suis pigiste pour plusieurs journaux.”, “I am a freelancer for several papers.”

 Any questions? Feel free to ask in the comment section!

Stay tuned daily for our tweets, and for those of you who haven’t started following us on Twitter, head there now and sign up!